Sound the Alarm - After a month of shut down nuclear reactors at San O, the hazards of nuclear energy spell

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Tuesday, January 31 looked like any other weekday along the coastline of San Onofre. From the freeway, you could see black dots crowding the peak at Lowers and spreading north to Cottons. The parking lot at Old Mans, perpetually full, as old men and blue-collared workers fit a session into their workday. Down the trails at San O, longboarders and SUPers cruised in the shadow of the bluffs, with the busty outline of the nuclear power plant looming from the landscape above.

But on this Tuesday, a warning sensor detected a small leak of radiation released into the local atmosphere, triggered by a malfunction in the Unit 3 reactor, which potentially exposed hundreds of local surfers and beachgoers to nuclear radiation. The facility claims that they were acceptable levels, yet the only monitoring of radiation comes from inside the energy company itself. The incident led to the discovery of extensive damage to tubes carrying radioactive water within the facility and the eventual shutdown of the other reactor two days later. The story, however, has made few headlines. Other than a brief mention on the local news and some online coverage, it has been developing under the radar for more than a month now. Today, both reactors are still offline, and the facility remains under inspection.

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tehdely
2 years ago

Shut them all down.

Humans are not responsible or smart enough to safely split the atom. And the operators of these plans are big, fat liars.

tehdely
2 years ago

< snip double post >

sharkturd
2 years ago

good info to know, thanks for posting...and somewhat surprised that this was culled from surfermag since they do about zero investigative reporting even on important ocean-related issues such as this and usually just choose to not rock the boat. So kudos to them as well. Yes, I'm inclined to agreee with tehdely. We're still not even responsible or smart enough to deal with the spent fuel from these ticking time bombs. Even if all the world's reactors were shut down the spent rods question remains.

Manuel Noriega
2 years ago

I will keep my eye out for Swamp Thing on an SUP

Rocco
2 years ago

Technology has evolved quicker than humans = technology killing humans. We aint ready!

zappalives
2 years ago

i'll tend to agree that as a species, we are not mature enough to manage the various bi-products of nuclear energy.

that being said, to shut down all nuclear power plants in the US is unrealistic. it accounts for 20% of the energy produced in the US, and to fill that void with traditional fossil fuels isn't doing anyone any good either. don't get me wrong, there needs to be SERIOUS regulation on nuclear, and plants like SONGS pose a huge risk and should probably be shut down permanently. but to say all of them need to go is a bit far.

this coming from the guy who sells solar panels for a living.....

zappalives
2 years ago

p.s. hope there aren't any good spots near diablo canyon. cause that place is screwed too....

fatnewt
2 years ago

Nuclear power plants are relatively safe during mid-life. The problem is that all of our nuclear plants (in the US) are old. they keep pulling permits to run them past their "useful life." Incidents and accidents tend to happen at the beginning when they're brought online and as they age. The situation we're faced with now is a bunch of old reactors with issues and the possibility of bringing new ones online which is also problematic as it takes a while to get the kinks out.

That said, if were to take all the money we spent in Iraq and put it into solar panels we would be virtually 100% energy independent.

Capra
2 years ago

The big problem with solar panels is cost and efficiency. It's a nice idea, but almost unrealistic considering our current energy demands and economic constraints.

fatnewt
2 years ago

I think that if you took the write-offs given to major oil companies and applied those directly to straight offset distributed solar panel purchase and installation the numbers would look pretty good. We're quickly approaching cost pre watt parity between solar and coal produced energy. Nothing's perfect, which is why energy policy needs to be decided top-down without vested interests in the room or writing the legislation.

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